Two Pink Sheet plays that could shake ND’s oil industry

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California-based Origin Oil, (OTCMKTS:OOIL) once focused on producing fuels and chemicals from algae oils, has been in the process of refocusing its work on clean up processes for contaminated fracking water. Hydraulic fracturing’s greedy water usage  has prompted some industry insiders to fear increased government regulation. Origin Oil says it has solved this problem.

The company recently sold a $1.4 million system to a major Mid East oil and gas services firm, Oman’s Gulf Energy.

“Here at Gulf Energy, we are committed to the hydraulic fracture market in the MENA region, which by definition includes the treatment of frac flowback and produced water for recycling. The test results from OriginOil’s CLEAN-FRAC system demonstrations in Colorado and Texas were so impressive, we decided to move forward with a commercial scale five thousand barrel per day system,” stated Yasser Al Barami, Chief Commercial Officer of Gulf Energy SAOC. “We intend to build future units ourselves based on the design of this first unit, but we decided it was prudent to purchase a complete first system which we will mount on a mobile platform.”

OriginOil says its  CLEAN-FRAC is a complete solution that can be designed for enhanced oil recovery, hydraulic fracturing operations, irrigation water, and even potable water. It begins with OriginOil’s core EWS technology to remove oil, solids and bacteria, and adds downstream processes to achieve the desired result. Will Bakken frackers start buying these systems?

Quantam Energy wants its microrefinery strategy, that would manufacture diesel fuel to sell directly to consumers within a 100 mile radius of the facilities,  to be a game changer. It would provide a local market for stranded crude–we know Cushing is backed up–and buffer diesel costs  for the agricultural sector. Any business plan that makes connections between the ag and oil industries in North Dakota is interesting, but several companies with “microrefinery” plans in the chemicals, petrol and renewables sectors have found it tough going. Is Quantam’s microrefinery plan a pipe dream? We’d like to hear answers in the comments section.

 

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